Loughborough University
Leicestershire, UK
LE11 3TU
+44 (0)1509 263171
Loughborough University

Loughborough University Research Publications


Publications for John Hillier

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Journal Articles

Bloomfield, HC, Bates, P, Shaffrey, LC, Hillier, J, Champion, A, Cotterill, D, Pope, JO, Kumar, D (2024) Synoptic conditions conducive for compound wind-flood events in Great Britain in present and future climates, Environmental Research Letters, 19(2), 024019, DOI: 10.1088/1748-9326/ad1cb7.

Thompson, J, Wilby, R, Hillier, J, Connell, R, Saville, GR (2023) Climate gentrification: valuing perceived climate risks in property prices, Annals of the American Association of Geographers, 113(5), pp.1092-1111, ISSN: 2469-4452. DOI: 10.1080/24694452.2022.2156318.

Bloomfield, H, Hillier, J, Griffin, A, Kay, A, Shaffrey, L, Pianosi, F, James, R, Kumar, D, Champion, A, Bates, P (2023) Co-occurring wintertime flooding and extreme wind over Europe, from daily to seasonal timescales, Weather and Climate Extremes, 39, 100550, ISSN: 2212-0947. DOI: 10.1016/j.wace.2023.100550.

Timms, P, Hillier, J, Holland, C (Accepted for publication) Increase data sharing or die? An initial view for natural catastrophe insurance, Geography, 107(1), DOI: 10.31223/x5k313.

Hillier, J, Unsworth, C, De Clerk, L, Savel'ev, S (Accepted for publication) GC Insights: Identifying conditions that sculpted bedforms – Human insights to build an effective AI, Geoscience Communication, ISSN: 2569-7110. DOI: 10.5194/gc-2021-22.

Bevacqua, E, De Michele, C, Manning, C, Couasnon, A, Ribeiro, AFS, Ramos, AM, Vignotto, E, Bastos, A, Blesić, S, Durante, F, Hillier, J, Oliveira, SC, Pinto, JG, Ragno, E, Rivoire, P, Saunders, K, van der Wiel, K, Wu, W, Zhang, T, Zscheischler, J (2021) Guidelines for studying diverse types of compound weather and climate events, Earth's Future, 9(11), e2021EF002340, ISSN: 2328-4277. DOI: 10.1029/2021EF002340.

Hillier, JK, Welsh, KE, Stiller-Reeve, M, Priestley, RK, Roop, HA, Lanza, T, Illingworth, S (2021) Editorial: Geoscience communication – planning to make it publishable, Geoscience Communication, 4(4), pp.493-506, DOI: 10.5194/gc-4-493-2021.

Hillier, J, Welsh, KE, Stiller-Reeve, M, Priestley, RK, Roop, HA, Lanza, T, Illingworth, S (Accepted for publication) Editorial: Geoscience communication – Planning to make it publishable, Geoscience Communication, ISSN: 2569-7110. DOI: 10.5194/gc-2021-13.

Morino, C, Conway, SJ, Balme, MR, Helgason, JK, Sæmundsson, Þ, Jordan, C, Hillier, J, Argles, T (2021) The impact of ground-ice thaw on landslide geomorphology and dynamics: two case studies in northern Iceland, Landslides, 18(8), pp.2785-2812, ISSN: 1612-510X. DOI: 10.1007/s10346-021-01661-1.

Hillier, J and Dixon, RS (2020) Seasonal impact-based mapping of compound hazards, Environmental Research Letters, 15(11), 114013, ISSN: 1748-9326. DOI: 10.1088/1748-9326/abbc3d.

Hillier, J, Matthews, T, Wilby, R, Murphy, C (2020) Multi-hazard dependencies can increase or decrease risk, Nature Climate Change, 10, pp.595-598, ISSN: 1758-678X. DOI: 10.1038/s41558-020-0832-y.

He, C, Hillier, J, Milne, A, Park, S, Soetanto, R (2020) Using insurance instruments to improve disaster risk finance in Indonesia, SSRN, DOI: 10.2139/ssrn.3350194.

Hillier, JK (2020) Review, DOI: 10.5194/gc-2019-22-rc2.

Mills, S, Brocq, AL, Winter, K, Smith, M, Hillier, J, Ardakova, E, Boston, C, Sugden, D, Woodward, J (2019) Testing and application of a model for snow redistribution (Snow_Blow) in the Ellsworth Mountains, Antarctica, Journal of Glaciology, 65(254), pp.957-970, ISSN: 0022-1430. DOI: 10.1017/jog.2019.70.

De-Luca, P, Harpham, C, Wilby, R, Hillier, J, Franzke, C, Leckebusch, G (2019) Past and projected weather pattern persistence with associated multi-hazards in the British Isles, Atmosphere, 10, 577, DOI: 10.3390/atmos10100577.

Courty, L, Wilby, R, Hillier, J, Slater, L (2019) Intensity-duration-frequency curves at the global scale, Environmental Research Letters, 14, 084045, ISSN: 1748-9326. DOI: 10.1088/1748-9326/ab370a.

Morino, C, Conway, SJ, Saemundsson, T, Helgason, JK, Hillier, J, Butcher, FEG, Balme, M, Jordan, CJ, Argles, T (2019) Molards as an indicator of permafrost degradation and landslide processes, Earth and Planetary Science Letters, 516, pp.136-147, ISSN: 0012-821X. DOI: 10.1016/j.epsl.2019.03.040.

Hillier, J, Saville, GR, Smith, MJ, Scott, AJ, Raven, EK, Gascoigne, J, Slater, L, Quinn, NW, Tsanakas, A, Souch, C, Leckebusch, GC, Macdonald, N, Milner, AM, Loxton, J, Wilebore, R, Collins, A, MacKenzine, C, Tweddle, J, Moller, S, Dove, M, Langford, H, Craig, J (2019) Demystifying academics to enhance university-business collaborations in environmental science, Geoscience Communication, ISSN: 2569-7102. DOI: 10.5194/gc-2018-13.

Hillier, J, Benediktsson, I, Dowling, T, Schomacker, A (2018) Production and preservation of the smallest drumlins, GFF, ISSN: 1103-5897. DOI: 10.1080/11035897.2018.1457714.

Morino, C, Conway, SJ, Balme, M, Hillier, J, Jordan, CJ, Saemundsson, T, Argles, T (2018) Debris-flow release processes investigated through the analysis of multi-temporal LiDAR datasets in north-western Iceland, Earth Surface Processes and Landforms, ISSN: 0197-9337. DOI: 10.1002/esp.4488.

De Luca, P, Hillier, J, Wilby, R, Quinn, NW, Harrigan, S (2017) Extreme multi-basin flooding linked with extra-tropical cyclones, Environmental Research Letters, 12(11), 114009, DOI: 10.1088/1748-9326/aa868e.

Postance, B, Hillier, J, Dijkstra, T, Dixon, N (2017) Comparing threshold definition techniques for rainfall induced landslides: a national assessment using radar rainfall, Earth Surface Processes and Landforms, 43(2), pp.553-560, ISSN: 0197-9337. DOI: 10.1002/esp.4202.

Wilby, R, Clifford, N, De Luca, P, Harrigan, S, Hillier, J, Hodgkins, R, Johnson, MF, Matthews, TKR, Murphy, C, Noone, S, Parry, S, Prudhomme, C, Rice, S, Slater, L, Smith, K, Wood, P (2017) The “dirty dozen” of freshwater science: Detecting then reconciling hydrological data biases and errors, Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews (WIREs) Water, ISSN: 2049-1948. DOI: 10.1002/wat2.1209.

Postance, B, Hillier, J, Dijkstra, T, Dixon, N (2017) Extending natural hazard impacts: an assessment of landslide disruptions on a national road transportation network, Environmental Research Letters, 12(1), 014010, ISSN: 1748-9326. DOI: 10.1088/1748-9326/aa5555.

Caballero-Megiddo, C, Hillier, J, Wyncol, D, Gouldby, B, Bosher, L (2017) Technical Note: Comparison of methods for threshold selection for extreme sea levels, Journal of Flood Risk Management, ISSN: 1753-318X. DOI: 10.1111/jfr3.12296.

Powell, DM, Ockelford, A, Rice, S, Hillier, J, Nguyen, T, Reid, I, Tate, NJ, Ackerley, D (2016) Structural properties of mobile armors formed at different flow strengths in gravel-bed rivers, Journal of Geophysical Research. Earth Surface, ISSN: 2169-9003. DOI: 10.1002/2015JF003794.

Hillier, J, Kougioumtzoglou, IA, Stokes, CR, Smith, MJ, Clark, CD, Spagnolo, M (2016) Exploring explanations of subglacial bedform sizes using statistical models, PLoS One, ISSN: 1932-6203. DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0159489.

Sofia, G, Hillier, J, Conway, SJ (2016) Frontiers in geomorphometry and earth surface dynamics: possibilities, limitations and perspectives, Earth Surface Dynamics, ISSN: 2196-6311. DOI: 10.5194/esurf-4-721-2016.

Hillier, J, Macdonald, N, Leckebusch, GC, Stavrinides, A (2015) Interactions between apparently ‘primary’ weather-driven hazards and their cost, Environmental Research Letters, 10, 104003, ISSN: 1748-9326. DOI: 10.1088/1748-9326/10/10/104003.

Chamberlain, M, Hillier, J, Signoretta, P (2015) Counting better? An examination of the impact of quantitative method teaching on students’ statistical anxiety and confidence to complete statistical tasks, Active Learning in Higher Education, 16(1), pp.1-16, ISSN: 1741-2625. DOI: 10.1177/1469787414558983.

Livingstone, SJ, Storrar, R, Hillier, J, Stokes, CR, Clark, CD, Tarasov, L (2015) An ice-sheet scale comparison of eskers with modelled subglacial drainage routes, Geomorphology, ISSN: 1872-695X. DOI: 10.1016/j.geomorph.2015.06.016.

Hillier, J, Sofia, G, Conway, SJ (2015) Perspective – synthetic DEMs: a vital underpinning for the quantitative future of landform analysis?, Earth Surface Dynamics, ISSN: 2196-6311. DOI: 10.5194/esurf-3-587-2015.

Eisank, C, Smith, M, Hillier, J (2014) Assessment of multiresolution segmentation for delimiting drumlins in digital elevation models, Geomorphology, 214, pp.452-464, ISSN: 0169-555X. DOI: 10.1016/j.geomorph.2014.02.028.

Croon, MB, Hillier, J, Sclater, JG (2014) Comment on 'Mantle Flow Drives the Subsidence of Oceanic Plates', Science, 331(6020), p.1011, ISSN: 0036-8075. DOI: 10.1126/science.1193587.

Hillier, JK and Smith, MJ (2014) Testing techniques to quantify drumlin height and volume: Synthetic DEMs as a diagnostic tool, Earth Surface Processes and Landforms, 39(5), pp.676-688, ISSN: 0197-9337. DOI: 10.1002/esp.3530.

Royse, KR, Hillier, J, Wang, L, Lee, TF, O'Niel, J, Kingdon, A, Hughes, A (2014) The application of componentised modelling techniques to catastrophe model generation, Environmental Modelling and Software, 61, pp.65-77, ISSN: 1364-8152. DOI: 10.1016/j.envsoft.2014.07.005.

Passalacqua, P, Hillier, J, Tarolli, P (2014) Innovative analysis and use of high-resolution DTMs for quantitative interrogation of Earth-surface processes, EARTH SURFACE PROCESSES AND LANDFORMS, 39(10), pp.1400-1403, ISSN: 0197-9337. DOI: 10.1002/esp.3616.

Hillier, J, Smith, MJ, Armugam, R, Barr, I, Boston, CM, Clark, CD, Ely, J, Fankl, A, Greenwood, SL, Gosselin, L, Hattestrand, C, Hogan, K, Hughes, ALC, Livingstone, SJ, Lovell, H, McHenry, M, Munoz, Y, Pellicer, XM, Pellitero, R, Robb, C, Roberson, S, Ruther, D, Spagnolo, M, Standell, MR, Stokes, CR, Storrar, R, Tate, NJ, Wooldridge, K (2014) Manual mapping of drumlins in synthetic landscapes to assess operator effectiveness, Journal of Maps, DOI: 10.1080/17445647.2014.957251.

Signoretta, P, Chamberlain, M, Hillier, J (2014) ‘A picture is worth ten thousand words’: a module to test the ‘visualization hypothesis’ in quantitative methods teaching, Enhancing Learning in the Social Sciences, 6(2), pp.1-15, ISSN: 1756-848X. DOI: 10.11120/elss.2014.00029.

Hillier, JK, Smith, MJ, Clark, CD, Stokes, CR, Spagnolo, M (2013) Subglacial bedforms reveal an exponential size-frequency distribution, Geomorphology, 190, pp.82-91, ISSN: 0169-555X. DOI: 10.1016/j.geomorph.2013.02.017.

Goutorbe, B and Hillier, JK (2013) An integration to optimally constrain the thermal structure of oceanic lithosphere, Journal of Geophysical Research: Solid Earth, 118(1), pp.432-446, ISSN: 2169-9313. DOI: 10.1029/2012JB009527.

Hillier, JK and Smith, MJ (2012) Testing 3D landform quantification methods with synthetic drumlins in a real digital elevation model, Geomorphology, 153-154, pp.61-73, ISSN: 0169-555X.

Hillier, J (2010) The Subsidence of 'Normal' Seafloor: Observations do Indicate 'Flattening', Journal of Geophysical Research, 115, pp.1-6, DOI: 10.1029/2008JB005994.

Sparkes, R, Tilmann, F, Hovius, N, Hillier, J (2010) Subducted seafloor relief stops rupture in South American great earthquakes: Implications for rupture behaviour in the 2010 Maule, Chile earthquake, Earth Planet. Sci. Lett, 298, pp.89-94, DOI: 10.1016/j.epsl.2010.07.029.

Hillier, JK, Tilmann, F, Hovius, N (2008) Editorial submarine geomorphology: New views on an 'unseen' landscape, Basin Research, 20(4), pp.467-472, ISSN: 0950-091X. DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2117.2008.00387.x.

Hillier, J (2008) Seamount (submarine volcano) detection and isolation with a modified wavelet transform, Basin Research, 20, pp.555-573, DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2117.2008.00382.x.

Hillier, J and Smith, M (2008) Residual relief separation: digital elevation model enhancement for geomorphological mapping, Earth Surface Processes and Landforms, 33(14), pp.2266-2276, ISSN: 0197-9337. DOI: 10.1002/esp.1659.

Hillier, JK (2007) Pacific seamount volcanism in space and time, Geophysical Journal International, 168(2), pp.877-889, ISSN: 0956-540X. DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-246X.2006.03250.x.

Hillier, J and Watts, AB (2007) Global Distribution of Seamounts From Ship-Track Bathymetry Data, Geophysical. Research. Letters, 34, pp.1-5, DOI: 10.1029/2007GL029874.

Hillier, J, Bunbury, J, Graham, A (2007) Monuments on a Migrating Nile, Journal of Archaeological Science, 34, pp.1011-1015, DOI: 10.1016/j.jas.2006.09.011.

Hillier, J and Watts, AB (2005) The Relationship Between Depth and Age in the North Pacific, Journal of Geophysical Research, 110, pp.1-22, DOI: 10.1029/2004JB003406.

Hillier, J and Watts, AB (2004) Plate-like subsidence of the East Pacific Rise - South Pacific Superswell system, Journal of Geophysical. Research, 109, pp.1-20, DOI: 10.1029/2004JB003041.

Hillier, J and van Meeteren, M (Accepted for publication) Co-RISK: a tool to co-create impactful university–industry projects for natural hazard risk mitigation, Geoscience Communication, 7(1), pp.35-56, DOI: 10.5194/gc-7-35-2024.



Conferences

Hillier, JK and Dixon, RS (2020) Seasonal impact-based mapping of compound hazards. In EGU General Assembly, Virtual. DOI: 10.5194/egusphere-egu21-1247.

Farnham, M, Camacho-Suarez, V, Milne, A, Hillier, J, Yu, D, Slater, L, Whyte, L, Baruch, A (Accepted for publication) Correlating surface water flood damages in three Indonesia cities. In EGU General Assembly, Virtual. DOI: 10.5194/egusphere-egu2020-9253.

Hillier, J, Done, J, Steptoe, H (Accepted for publication) Exploring Inter-Basin Correlations of Tropical Cyclones and Tropical Cyclone Losses. In EGU General Assembly, Virtual. DOI: 10.5194/egusphere-egu2020-7460.

De Luca, P, Hillier, J, Leckebusch, GC, Wilby, R (2018) Independent and interacting wet-dry extremes in Great Britain within a multivariate dependence model [Abstract]. In European Geosciences Union (EGU) General Assembly 2018, Vienna, Austria.

De Luca, P, Harpham, C, Wilby, R, Leckebusch, GC, Franzke, C, Hillier, J (2018) Twenty-first century CMIP5 projections of atmospheric circulation over British Isles under RCP4.5 and RCP8.5 scenarios [Abstract]. In European Geosciences Union (EGU) General Assembly 2018, Vienna, Austria.

De Luca, P, Hillier, J, Wilby, R, Quinn, NW, Harrigan, S (2017) Extreme multi-basin fluvial flows and their relationship to extra-tropical cyclones [Abstract]. In European Geosciences Union (EGU), General Assembly 2017, Vienna (Austria).

Hillier, J, De Luca, P, Wilby, R, Quinn, NW, Harrigan, S (2017) Observations relating extreme multi-basin river flows to very severe gales [Abstract]. In European Geosciences Union (EGU), General Assembly 2017, Vienna (Austria).

Morino, C, Conway, S, Balme, M, Jordan, C, Hillier, J, Argles, T (2015) The comparison between two airborne LiDAR datasets to analyse debris flow initiation in north-western Iceland EGU2015-11628. In European Geosciences Union, Vienna, pp.1-1.

Hillier, J, Sofia, G, Conway, S (2015) Perspective – Synthetic DEMs: A vital underpinning for the quantitative future of landform analysis? EGU2015-1593. In European Geosciences Union, Vienna, pp.1-1.

Hillier, J and Smith, M (2015) Testing the reliability of manual mapping of glacial landforms: Initial results: EGU2015-1562. In European Geosciences Union, Vienna, pp.1-1.

Postance, B, Hillier, J, Dixon, N, Dijkstra, T (2015) Quantification of road network vulnerability and traffic impacts to regional landslide hazards [abstract]. In European Geosciences Union, Vienna, pp.1-1.

Livingstone, S, Storrar, R, Stokes, C, Clark, C, Tarasov, L, Hillier, J (2014) An ice-sheet scale comparison of diagnosed subglacial drainage routes with esker network. EGU2014-6455. In EGU, Geophys. Res. Abs, Vienna.

Hillier, J and Smith, M (2014) Glacial Landforms, how distorted is our view of them? EGU2014-4360. In EGU, Geophys. Res. Abs, Vienna.

Goutorbe, B and Hillier, J (2014) On the use of seismic tomography to optimally constrain the thermal evolution of oceanic lithosphere: EGU2014-16326. In European Geosciences Union General Assembly, Geophys. Res. Abs, Vienna, Austria.

Hillier, J, Smith, M, Clark, C, Stokes, C, Spagnolo, M (2013) Exponential glacial bedform size-frequency populations. In British Branch Meeting of the International Glaciological Society, Loughborough.

Signoretta, P, Chamberlain, J, Hillier, J (2013) An investigation into the impact of visual teaching and learning strategies on undergraduate student's self-reported experience of quantitative research methods teaching. In 11th European Sociological Association Conference, Trino, Italy.

Smith, M, Eisank, C, Hillier, J (2013) Supervised testing of segmentation for automated delimitation of landforms in DEMs: Abs ID 1342. In 8th IAG International Conference on Geomorphology, Paris.

Chamberlain, JM, Signoretta, P, Hillier, J (2013) Examining the impact of visual teaching and learning strategies on undergraduate students self-reported experience of quantitative research methods teaching: update from the Loughborough Project. In HEA Workshop Series: Visualization and Quantitative Methods, http://blogs.heacademy.ac.uk/social-sciences/2013/06/24/visualisation-and-teaching-quantitative-research-methods-to-sociology-and-criminology-students/, Loughborough University, pp.1-1.

Hillier, J, Smith, M, Clark, C, Stokes, C, Spagnolo, M (2013) Exponential glacial bedform size-frequency populations. EGU2013-5809. In EGU, Geophys. Res. Abs, Vienna.

Wang, L, Hillier, J, Royse, K, Lee, T, O'Niel, J, Kingdon, A, Hughes, A (2013) An illustrative ‘plug & play’ catastrophe model for groundwater flooding. EGU2013-8169. In EGU, Geophys. Res. Abs, Vienna.

Eisank, C, Smith, M, Hillier, J (2013) Multi-resolution segmentation to automatically delimit landforms in DEMs: tests using synthetic drumlins. EGU2013-2947. In EGU, Geophys. Res. Abs, Vienna.

Goutorbe, B and Hillier, J (2013) An integration to optimally constrain the thermal structure of the oceanic lithosphere. EGU2013-5748. In EGU, Geophys. Res. Abs, Vienna.

Chamberlain, JM, Signoretta, P, Hillier, J (2013) An investigation into the impact of visual teaching and learning strategies on undergraduate student's self-reported experience of quantitative research methods teaching. In QM Teachers’ Workshop, Royal Statistical Society, London.

Armugam, R, Hillier, J, Smith, M (2012) Quantifying how well drumlins can be mapped using synthetic DEMs. In IAG/AIG International Workshop: ‘Objective Geomorphological Representation Models: Breaking Through a New Geomorphological Mapping Frontier”, University of Salerno.

Hillier, J and Smith, M (2012) Drumlin fields do usefully record ice flow direction. In British Branch Meeting of the International Glaciological Society, Aberdeen.

Hillier, J and Smith, M (2012) Robust 3D quantification of glacial landforms: A use of idealised drumlins in a real DEM. In BSG Annual Conference, Nottingham.

Hillier, J and Smith, M (2012) Robust 3D Quantification of Glacial Landforms: A Use of Idealised Drumlins in a Real DEM. In EGU, Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vienna.

Hillier, J (2011) Testing Quantification Methods with Synthetic Drumlins in a real DEM. In EGU, Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vienna.

Royse, K, Hughes, A, Hillier, J, O'Niel, J, Wang, L, Kingdom, A (2011) The Use Of Model Fusion in the Development of ‘Plug and Play’ Catastrophe Models. In Model Fusion, Geol. Soc. London.

Hughes, A, O'Niel, J, Hillier, J, Wang, L, Royse, K, Kingdom, A (2011) PURE Experimental Zone Prototype. In PURE: Probability, Uncertainty and Risk in the Environment call brokerage and network launch event, Lloyds, London.

Hillier, J (2011) Testing Quantification Methods with Synthetic Drumlins in a real DEM. In British Branch Meeting of the International Glaciology, BAS, Cambridge.

Sparkes, R, Tilmann, F, Hovius, N, Hillier, J (2011) Subducted Seafloor Relief Stops Rupture in South American Great Earthquakes: Implications for the Rupture Behaviour of the 2010 Maule, Chile Earthquake. In British Geophysical Association: New Advances in Geophysics Meeting, Geol. Soc. London.

Sparkes, R, Tilmann, F, Hovius, N, Hillier, J (2010) Subducted Seafloor Relief Stops Rutpure in South American Great Earthquakes: Implications for the Rupture Behaviour of the 2010 Maule, Chile Earthquake. In AGU, Eos Transactions AGU, San Francisco.

Hillier, J (2008) Does Hypsometry Necessarily Invalidate the Cooling-Plate Model?. In EGU General Assembly, Geophysical. Research. Abstracts, Vienna, pp.A-04229.

Sparkes, R, Tilmann, F, Novius, N, Hillier, J, Jeffrey, L (2008) Topographic Controls on the Rupture Area of Great Subduction Earthquakes. In EGU, Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vienna.

Hillier, J, Lutley, C, Bunbury, J, Graham, A (2007) Mapping the Nile's Course in Archaeological Times: Preliminary Interpretation in the Cairo Region. In From Source to Sink: The Pliocene-Quaternary Nile, %, Manchester, %.

Kite, ES, Hovius, N, Hillier, J, Besserer, J (2007) Probable Mud Volcanoes in the Northern Plains of Mars. In ESA, European Mars Science and Exploration Conference: Mars Express & ExoMars ESTEC, %, Noordwijk, Netherlands, %.

Kite, ES, Hovius, N, Hillier, J, Besserer, J (2007) Candidate Mud Volcanoes in the Northern Plains of Mars. In AGU Fall Meeting, Eos. Trans. AGU, San Francisco, pp.V13B-1346.

Hillier, J (2007) Migrations of the Course of the River Nile between Luxor & Qift Over the Last 4,000 years. In Hanna, DH (ed) Conference of the Naqada and Qus Region, Monastery of the Archangel Michael, Naqada, Egypt, pp.88-97, ISBN: 9776088023.

Hillier, J and Smith, MJ (2007) Landscape-Analysis Based Visualization of Drumlins. In Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vienna, pp.A-10656.

Hillier, J (2007) A Global Model of Mantle Melting and Lithospheric Permeability Constrained by Seamounts. In AGU General Assembly, Eos. Trans. AGU, San Francisco, pp.V31E-02.

Hillier, J and Watts, AB (2006) The Size-Frequency and Spatial Distribution of Submarine Volcanic Features. In EGU General Assembly, Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vienna, pp.A-07517.

Hillier, J and Watts, AB (2005) Pacific Seamount Volcanism in Space and Time. In EGU General Assembly, Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vienna, p.01324.

Hillier, J and Watts, AB (2004) The Plate-Like Subsidence of the East Pacific Rise - South Pacific Superswell System. In AGU Fall Meeting, Eos. Trans. AGU, San Francisco, pp.V21F-04.

Hillier, J and Watts, AB (2004) The Plate-Like Subsidence of the East Pacific Rise - South Pacific Superswell System. In Oceanic Intra-plate Volcanism, %, Geological Society London, %.

Hillier, J (2003) A Morphological Dissection of the SW Pacific Ocean. In PREMS, %, Southampton, %.

Hillier, J and Watts, AB (2002) Objective, Unbiased, Multiscale Regional-Residual Separation of Shipboard Bathymetry Data. In AGU Fall Meeting, Eos. Trans. AGU, San Francisco, pp.T12D-1337.



Books

Mitchell-Wallace, K, Jones, M, Hillier, J, Foote, M (2017) Natural catastrophe risk management and modelling: A practitioner’s guide, Wiley, ISBN: 9781118906040.



Chapters

Smith, MJ, Otto, JC, Moore, AB, Grohmann, CH, Hillier, J, Geilhausen, M (2022) Geovisualization. In Treatise on Geomorphology, pp.319-361, DOI: 10.1016/B978-0-12-818234-5.00147-4.

Sclater, JG, Hasterok, D, Goutorbe, B, Hillier, J, Negrete, R (2016) Marine heat flow. In J, H, M, M, S, P, J, T (ed) Unknown Parent Title, Springer, pp.1-10, ISBN: 9789400762374. DOI: 10.1007/978-94-007-6644-0_112-1.

Royse, KR, Hillier, J, Hughes, A, Kingdon, A, Singh, A, Wang, L (2016) The potential for the use of model fusion techniques in building and developing catastrophe models. In AT, R, H, K, JAR, G (ed) Unknown Parent Title, © The Geological Society of London, pp.1-11, ISBN: 9781862396876. DOI: 10.1144/SP408.7.

Sclater, JG, Hasterok, D, Goutorbe, B, Hillier, J, Negrete, R (2016) Marine heat flow. In Encyclopedia of Earth Sciences Series, pp.449-460, DOI: 10.1007/978-94-007-6644-0_112-1.

Smith, MJ, Hillier, J, Otto, J-C, Geilhausen, M (2013) Geovisualization. In Unknown Parent Title, © Elsevier, pp.299-325, DOI: 10.1016/B978-0-12-374739-6.00054-3.

Smith, MJ, Hillier, JK, Otto, JC, Geilhausen, M (2013) Geovisualization. In Treatise on Geomorphology: Volume 1-14, pp.299-325, DOI: 10.1016/B978-0-12-374739-6.00054-3.

Hillier, JK (2011) Submarine Geomorphology. Quantitative Methods Illustrated with the Hawaiian Volcanoes. In Developments in Earth Surface Processes, pp.359-375, DOI: 10.1016/B978-0-444-53446-0.00012-4.

Hillier, J (2007) Migrations of the course of the river Nile between Luxor & Qift over the last 4,000 years. In Meeting, ICOMCFC and Hanna, H (ed) ICOM-CC-wood, Furniture and Lacquer: Conference of the Naqada and Qus Region, pp.88-97, ISBN: 9789776088023.



School/Dept Working Papers

Hillier, J (2019) The making of ... some thoughts by John Hillier.



Internet Publications

Holland, C, Zarkadakis, G, Hillier, J, Timms, PD, Stanbrough, L (2021) Data sharing models in the insurance industry: Strategic change and future direction.



Posters

De Luca, P, Hillier, J, Wilby, R, Quinn, NW, Harrigan, S (2017) Extreme multi-basin flooding linked with extra-tropical cyclones [Poster].

De Luca, P, Hillier, J, Wilby, R, Quinn, NW, Harrigan, S (2016) EXTREME MULTI-BASIN FLUVIAL FLOWS IN GREAT BRITAIN DURING 1975-2014: ANALYSIS OF THEIR SPATIAL AND TEMPORAL EXTENT, Loughborough Research Conference 2016.



Reports

Hillier, J, Foote, M, Tsanakas, A, Wardman, J, Mitchell-Wallace, K, Dixon, R, Simeonova, B, Hughes, R, Brown, C (Accepted for publication) Investing in science for natural hazards insurance.

Hillier, J, Timms, P, Holland, CP (Accepted for publication) Visions of data sharing in insurance: survey results.



Thesis/Dissertation

Hillier, J (2005) The Bathymetry of the Pacific Ocean Basin and its Tectonic Implications.



Presentations

Hillier, J (2018) 2018_Oasis_Presentation.pdf.



Other

Hillier, J, Champion, A, Perkins, T, Garry, F, Bloomfield, H (2023) Supplementary material to "GC Insights: Open R-code to communicate the impact of co-occurring natural hazards". DOI: 10.5194/egusphere-2023-2799-supplement.

Hillier, J and van Meeteren, M (2023) Supplementary material to "Co-RISK: A tool to co-create impactful university-industry projects for natural hazard risk mitigation". DOI: 10.5194/egusphere-2023-1251-supplement.

Wells, H, Hillier, J, Garry, F, Dunstone, N, Chen, H, Kahraman, A, Keat, W, Clark, M (2023) Enhanced climatology of large hail in the UK: Radar-derived diurnal cycle and storm mode, Large hail, with a diameter of at least 20 mm, is a hazard associated with severe convective storms (SCS) that can cause significant damage. Understanding of atmospheric environments conducive to large hail is underpinned by catalogues of past events. Because of the small footprint of hail events, these often rely on crowdsourced reports. In the UK, the relative rarity of large hail and low public awareness of SCS hazards makes obtaining a complete set of reports difficult, and in many cases the precise time of the hail is not recorded. In this study, the two major databases of UK large hail reports are merged for the first time. Composite radar reflectivity data are used to verify and enhance 260 reports since 2006. Time of the hail and the basic storm mode (isolated, clustered or linear) are visually estimated from animations. Compared to the UK’s most severe historic hailstorms (1800–2004), our quality controlled climatology of all sizes of large hail shows a diurnal cycle with a slightly broader peak. Around 55% of large hail events are associated with isolated cells, while 34% have supercellular characteristics, a much lower proportion than found in the USA. The full event set (1979–2022), comprising over 850 reports, is used to update the seasonal, spatial and size distributions of large hail in the UK. We intend that this hail event set forms part of a multi-hazard analysis of UK SCS, also including tornadoes and extreme rainfall, and its relationship to background atmospheric conditions. The effect of climate change on UK SCS will be investigated through past and future trends in these background conditions.. DOI: 10.5194/egusphere-egu23-3406.

Kumar, D, Shaffrey, L, Dixon, R, Bloomfield, H, Bates, P, Hillier, J (2023) High-resolution loss modeling for European Windstorms, European windstorms are a frequent and damaging natural hazard that can cause loss of human life and damage to property and infrastructure. As there is a high degree of uncertainty in climate projections, it is crucial to understand the physical risks and economic losses at regional and local scales associated with European Windstorms. In this study, we develop a simple model to estimate historical windstorm losses over the European region. The model uses winds from the ERA5 reanalysis and different exposure datasets based on countrywide total insured property values, gross domestic product, and historical population density.We find that the estimated losses associated with major historical storms in North-western Europe and estimated average EU-wide losses are comparable to the reported estimates and those from propriety vendor models. However, estimated losses from windstorms in France and Germany are lower than reported. Differences in the estimated losses are attributed to the contrasts in the regional-level exposure within and between different exposure datasets. We also tested the sensitivity of regional-level vulnerabilities and find that accounting for regional-level vulnerability differences slightly improves the biases in countrywide losses. Further, we also find that the major contribution to the estimated losses comes from the United Kingdom, France, and Germany for most of the storm seasons, and thus it is important to correctly represent the exposure and vulnerabilities over these countries. The ability of the model to estimate reported losses is also limited by the representation of the winds in ERA5, which has limited skill in representing the hazard footprint, especially for specific storms such as the Great October Storm of 1987.Keywords: Losses, Windstorms, Climate Change, Natural Hazards. DOI: 10.5194/egusphere-egu23-12391.

Gani, S, Arnal, L, Beattie, L, Hillier, J, Illingworth, S, Lanza, T, Mohadjer, S, Pulkkinen, K, Roop, H, Stewart, I, Stiller-Reeve, M, von Elverfeldt, K, Zihms, S (2023) The shadowlands of science communication in academia — definitions, problems, and possible solutions, Science communication is important for researchers, including those working in the geosciences. However, much of this work takes place in “shadowlands” that are neither fully seen nor understood. With the increasing expectation in academia that all researchers should participate in science communication, there is an urgent need to address some of the major issues that lurk in these “shadowlands”. Here the editorial team of Geoscience Communication seeks to shine a light on the “shadowlands” of geoscience communication and suggest some solutions and examples of effective practice. The issues broadly fall under three categories: 1) unclear or harmful objectives; 2) poor quality and lack of rigor; and 3) exploitation of science communicators working within academia. Ameliorating these will require: 1) clarity in objectives and audiences; 2) adequately training science communicators; and 3) giving science communication equivalent recognition to other professional activities.. DOI: 10.5194/egusphere-egu23-5568.

Wells, H, Hillier, J, Garry, F, Dunstone, N, Chen, H, Kahraman, A, Keat, W, Clark, M (2023) Enhanced climatology of large hail in the UK: Radar-derived diurnal cycle and storm mode, <p><span class="fontstyle0">Large hail, with a diameter of at least 20 mm, is a hazard associated with severe convective storms (SCS) that can cause significant damage. Understanding of atmospheric environments conducive to large hail is underpinned by catalogues of past events. Because of the small footprint of hail events, these often rely on crowdsourced reports. In the UK, the relative rarity of large hail and low public awareness of SCS hazards makes obtaining a complete set of reports difficult, and in many cases the precise time of the hail is not recorded. In this study, the two major databases of UK large hail reports are merged for the first time. Composite radar reflectivity data are used to verify and enhance 260 reports since 2006. Time of the hail and the basic storm mode (isolated, clustered or linear) are visually estimated from animations. Compared to the UK’s most severe historic hailstorms (1800–2004), our quality controlled climatology of all sizes of large hail shows a diurnal cycle with a slightly broader peak. Around 55% of large hail events are associated with isolated cells, while 34% have supercellular characteristics, a much lower proportion than found in the USA. The full event set (1979–2022), comprising over 850 reports, is used to update the seasonal, spatial and size distributions of large hail in the UK. We intend that this hail event set forms part of a multi-hazard analysis of UK SCS, also including tornadoes and extreme rainfall, and its relationship to background atmospheric conditions. The effect of climate change on UK SCS will be investigated through past and future trends in these background conditions.</span> </p>. DOI: 10.5194/ecss2023-70.

Hillier, J, Bloomfield, H, Garry, F, Bates, P, Shaffrey, L (2023) Co-occurring British flood-wind events (1980-2080): Their anatomy & drivers, <p>In wintertime, infrastructure and property in NW Europe are threatened by multiple meteorological hazards, and it is increasingly apparent that these exacerbate risk by tending to co-occurring in events that last days to weeks. Impacted by Atlantic storms, Great Britain (GB) is a sentinel location for weather that later tracks into NW Europe.   A recent, dramatic storm sequence (Dudley, Eunice, Franklin) demonstrated the need for a multi-hazard view by bringing a mixture of damaging and disruptive extremes including extreme winds and flooding over 7-10 days in Feb 2022.</p> <p>This work uses a stakeholder inspired, event-based approach to jointly consider these two hazards.  A wind event set (<em>n</em><em> </em>= 3,426) is created from the 12km regional UK Climate projections (1981-1999, 2061-2079) to match previously created high-flow events (Griffin et al, 2023). Then, the two hazards’ time-series are merged using windows up to a maximum size (Δt = 1-180 days) positioned to maximize the size of the largest events’ impact. The benefits and limitations of this methodology are discussed, anatomy of storm sequences (Δt = 21 days) discussed, and potential drivers of co-occurrence in the multi-hazard sequences (e.g. jet stream position/strength) examined.</p>. DOI: 10.5194/egusphere-egu23-7203.

Hillier, JK, Unsworth, C, De Clerk, L, Savel'ev, S (2022) Identifying conditions that sculpted bedforms - Human insights to build an effective artificial intelligence ‘AI’, <p>Insights from a geoscience communication activity, verified using preliminary investigations with an artificial neural network, illustrate that observation of humans’ abilities can help design an effective machine learning algorithm - colloquially known as Artificial Intelligence or ‘AI’. Even given only one set of 'training' examples, survey participants could visually recognise which flow conditions created bedforms (e.g. sand dunes, riverbed ripples) from their shapes, but an interpreter's geoscience expertise does not help.  Together, these observations were interpreted as indicating that a machine learning algorithm might be trained successfully from limited data, particularly if it is 'helped' by pre-processing bedforms into a simple shape familiar from childhood play. [https://gc.copernicus.org/articles/5/11/2022/]</p>. DOI: 10.5194/egusphere-egu22-1437.

Bloomfield, H, Bates, P, Shaffrey, L, Hillier, J, James, R, Pianosi, F (2022) Quantifying the relationship between flood and wind damage over North-West Europe, in a present and future climate, <p>Strong winds and extremes in precipitation are capable of producing devastating socio-economic impacts across Europe. Although it is well known that individually these drivers cause billions of Euros of damage, their combined impacts are less well understood. Previous work has typically either focused on daily or seasonal timescales, demonstrating that compound wind and precipitation events are commonly associated with passing cyclones or particularly wet and windy years respectively. This study systematically investigates the relationships between national wind and flood damage metrics at all timescales ranging from daily to seasonal during the winter season. This work is completed using high resolution meteorological reanalysis and river flow datasets to explore the historical period (1980-present). As well as this, data from the UKCP18 climate projections at 2.2km and 12km resolution is used to understand historical sampling uncertainty, and the possible impacts of future climate change.</p><p>The correlation between national aggregate wind gusts and precipitation peaks at ~10 days; whereas, the correlation between national aggregate wind gusts and river flows peaks at ~3 weeks. When using more impact focussed metrics of compound wind and flood events, such as storm severity and flooding indices, the strongest correlations are seen at seasonal timescales. Results show the historical correlation between wind and flood damage becomes weaker as the definition of the metrics become more impact focussed, and this is true across all timescales from daily to seasonal. This change in relationship is of key importance to the insurance industry who require actionable information based on both the meteorological hazards and on the exposure of their portfolios. The work is designed to support climate analytics for financial institutions, as part of the UK Centre for Greening Finance and Investments (UKCGFI). Results incorporating the impacts of climate change on compound wind and flood events will also be discussed.</p>. DOI: 10.5194/egusphere-egu22-4727.

Illingworth, S, Hillier, J, Welsh, K, Stiller-Reeve, M, Priestley, R, Roop, H, Lanza, T (2022) Geoscience communication - Planning to make it publishable, <p>If you are a geoscientist doing work to achieve impact outside academia or engaging different audiences with the geosciences, are you planning to make this publishable? If so, then plan. Such investigations into how people (academics, practitioners, other publics) respond to geoscience can use pragmatic, simple research methodologies accessible to the non-specialist, or be more complex. To employ a medical analogy, first aid is useful and the best option in some scenarios but calling a medic (i.e. a collaborator with experience of geoscience communication or relevant research methods) provides the contextual knowledge to identify a condition and opens up a diverse, more powerful range of treatment options. Here, we expand upon the brief advice in the first editorial of <em>Geoscience Communication </em>(Illingworth et al, 2018), illustrating what constitutes robust and publishable work in this context, elucidating its key elements. Our aim is to help geoscience communicators plan a route to publication, and to illustrate how good engagement work that is already being done might be developed into publishable research. </p><p><strong>Reference</strong></p><div> <div> <div>Illingworth, S, Stewart, I, Tennant, J, and von Elverfeldt, K.: Editorial: <em>Geoscience Communication</em> – Building bridges, not walls, Geosci. Commun, 1, 1–7, https://doi.org/10.5194/gc-1-1-2018, 2018.</div> <p> </p> </div> </div><div> <div> </div> </div>. DOI: 10.5194/egusphere-egu22-868.

Hillier, JK (2016) Comments and review. DOI: 10.5194/esurf-2016-6-ec1.

Hillier, J, Kler, G, Tweddle, J (Accepted for publication) Demystifying Academics to Enhance University - Business Collaboration, University-derived research (e.g. science) is useful in ‘real world’ business applications, so effective collaboration is desirable. However, for work to actually proceed, strategic and policy-level drivers must align with the incentive structures and constraints upon individual university-based scientists and their motivations. This briefing aims to foster collaborations by providing a view from the perspective of individual academics. Specifically, it examines workload (i.e. specified tasks) and incentive structures (i.e. assessment criteria) to tackle two questions: What motivates academics to do specific work? And, reciprocally, what might constrain them? In light of this specific, pragmatic actions, including short-term and time-efficient steps are proposed in a ‘user guide’ to help initiate and nurture collaborations. And, some modes of institutional support are suggested. Main Points - Like other professions academics suffer time pressure, i.e. amid 20-50 key duties up to 0.5 days per week might potentially be found for activities with ‘real world’ impact. - Typically, for impact-related activities others must be sacrificed (e.g. research), creating a tension. - As yet, even in countries strongly promoting collaboration, the overriding imperative remains for academics to publish research (i.e. peer-reviewed journal articles). - Thus, to justify working with business, impact-related work must inspire curiosity and facilitate future novel research (e.g. science) to mitigate this conflict. .

De Luca, P, Harpham, C, Wilby, R, Hillier, J, Franzke, C, Leckebusch, G Past and projected weather pattern persistence with associated multi-hazards in the British Isles. DOI: 10.31223/osf.io/ghuzv.



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